Tag: study

Hypertrophy

Blood-flow restricted training 101

Jeremy Loenneke is an assistant professor of Exercise Science in the Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management at the University of Mississippi and has a PhD in Exercise Physiology from the University of Oklahoma. He is based in Oxford, Mississippi. Blood-flow restricted (BFR) training is exactly what it sounds like. It involves restricting blood flow into the muscle you are training, and occluding – or preventing – blood flow out of the muscle. In lab settings this is typically applied with specialised equipment, but can also be applied with knee wraps in the gym. This type of resistance…

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Fat Loss Nutrition

Why calories always count

Eric Helms is a pro natural bodybuilder, raw powerlifter and a coach at 3D Muscle Journey. He lives in Auckland, New Zealand. Are you focusing on nutrition incidentals and missing the factors that will have the biggest effect on your body composition? One of the most common things I see among bodybuilders or people interested in body composition is that we don’t know what are the big rocks and what are the pebbles. As a result we sometimes spend a lot of time and energy on the pebbles before we even have the big rocks in place. The reason why…

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Hypertrophy

Why range of motion matters

Chris Beardsley is a biomechanics researcher. He is also the editor of Strength and Conditioning Research. He is based in Loughborough, Leicestershire. If you walk into any gym, the chances are that the guy hanging from the chin-up bar isn’t doing full reps. Instead he’ll be doing some sort of juddering movement where the angle of his arms changes from bent to ever-so-slightly more bent. You probably mutter something about ‘terrible range of motion’ under your breath before starting your own workout, making sure you go to full extension and flexion on each rep. You do this because everybody knows…

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Hypertrophy

Should you try blood flow restricted training?

Jeremy Loenneke is an assistant professor of Exercise Science in the Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management at the University of Mississippi and has a PhD in Exercise Physiology from the University of Oklahoma. He is based in Oxford, Mississippi. Blood flow restricted training is exactly what it sounds like. It involves restricting blood flow into the muscle you are training, and occluding – or preventing – blood flow out of the muscle. In lab settings this is typically applied with specialised equipment but can also be applied with knee wraps in the gym. This type of resistance…

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Hypertrophy

How often should you lift to failure?

Chris Beardsley is a biomechanics researcher. He is also the editor of Strength and Conditioning Research. He is based in Loughborough, Leicestershire. Lifting to muscular failure when strength training is a tactic used by bodybuilders, pro athletes and the general population for maximising gains in muscular size. But is going all the way to muscular failure really better than leaving a few reps in the tank? Before we go any further, we need to establish exactly what the term ‘muscular failure’ means. Muscular failure is frequently used in research studies but precise definitions of this term are quite rarely discussed. In…

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Hypertrophy

Is volume the most important muscle mass variable?

Chris Beardsley is a biomechanics researcher. He is also the editor of Strength and Conditioning Research. He is based in Loughborough, Leicestershire. If you want to add more lean muscle mass in less time, then you need to crank up the volume. I don’t mean on the speakers on the gym stereo, but the amount of volume you lift when you train. Volume is defined by researchers as the number of sets and repetitions performed per muscle group in a single workout, and it is one of the most important training variables to consider for positive physiological adaptations Key training…

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Fat Loss Supps

Carnitine and fat-burning fiction

Aaron Deere is a sports nutritionist, functional medicine consultant and advanced personal trainer. He is based in London. Carnitine is a derivative of the amino acids lysine and methionine and is found in highest concentrations in red meat, with 100g containing approximately 95mg. Increased intake has been proposed to increase fat oxidation, delay muscle glycogen depletion, and increase endurance exercise performance[1,2]. The primary function of carnitine is to act as a co-factor in the enzymatic system involved in conjugating fatty acids for transport for mitochondrial beta-oxidation[3,4]. In layman terms this simply means it transports fat to cells where it can…

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Fat Loss Nutrition

Does skipping breakfast burn more fat?

Dr Sam Decombel is the chief operating officer of genetic research and development company MuscleGenes and has a PhD in Genetics from the University of Birmingham. She is based in Oxfordshire. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, right? A message perpetuated by health agencies around the world for many years, it seems that no matter what new diet fads emerge, the one thing that stays constant is the respect that breakfast holds in the public consciousness. Yet some of the most recent research emerging on meal timings is changing our perception on the way in which we…

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