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Throw for power

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Incorporating throws in your training is an easy and effective way of increasing your explosive power, says Jack Lovett

Jack Lovett is a S&C specialist, owner of Spartan Performance and two-time British natural strongman champion. He is based in Consett, County Durham.

If you want to build explosive power then throws are an essential part of your training regime, says IronLife expert Jack Lovett. The type of throw Lovett recommends in the video requires you to go into triple extension and will have a huge carry over onto the sports field, as well as benefiting gym lifts that require speed and hip drive. Throwing a medicine ball is also an easier skill to learn than other ways of training triple extension, such as the Olympic lifts. ‘I want you to perform the throws as explosively as possible,’ says Lovett. ‘Don’t go through the motions. I want you to perform them with bad intentions. It’s easy to gauge how you’re performing: how far did the ball go?’

Lovett has one further bit of advice: ‘It’s not a pissing contest,’ he says. ‘I’m sorry but it’s not. One common mistake I see is the load being too heavy. I’ve been guilty of that in the past but I’ve learned from my mistakes. I get a tremendous training effect, even with my stronger athletes, with a 3kg medicine ball. Yes, you can get heavier. I’ve seen slam balls that weigh 70kg. But heavier doesn’t necessarily mean better because it’s all abut the speed of movement and you want to be as explosive as you can and move the ball as fast as you can. So the big mistake I see is people choosing too heavy a medicine ball. We just want a good quality rep and I can get a lot higher quality with a 3kg med ball with the majority of clients that I work with than I could with a 6kg or 7kg ball. It doesn’t mean we never go heavy but you’ve got to be smart when you choose it.’ Watch the film below to get Lovett’s expert advice on getting the most out of including throws in your training regime.

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