Receive our free newsletters to #TrainSmarter with our free newsletters!


By submitting this form, you are granting: IronLife Media Ltd, Flat 7, London, E1 6NR, permission to email you. You may unsubscribe via the link found at the bottom of every email. (See our Email Privacy Policy (http://constantcontact.com/legal/privacy-statement) for details.) Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

Exclusive: Eddie Hall on how to get strong

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +
Eddie Hall has deadlifted 500kg – 40 kilos more than his closest competitor – and came third in last year’s World’s Strongest Man competition. He’s a Protein Dynamix sponsored athlete, and lives in Stoke

In July 2016, Eddie Hall took to the stage at the World Deadlift Championships and hoisted 500kg off the deck: a competition PB by 35kg. He’s now got his sights on his first World’s Strongest Man win. Here’s what he’s learned.

1 Use speed reps as well as maximal weights
I got stuck on a plateau three or four years ago, and I realise that you can’t just come into the gym every week and lift maximum weights, you have to incorporate different speeds to work different fibres. You’re basically training your slow-twitch and your fast-twitch. Doing your speed reps you’re letting your slow-twitch fibres rest. It’s something a lot of people can’t get in their head, but something that I understood pretty quickly and used to my advantage. I deadlift once a week: your body can barely recover from training once a week – if you did more you’d be going backwards. I’ll do 8 sets of 2, or if I’m in a rush 5 sets of 3. Full recovery between sets, anywhere between 5 and 10 minutes.

2 Find the setup that works for you
I like to use my body’s levers. I find that if you get low and then lean back and then sort of rock forward, it gets you in that perfect position to almost leg-press it up rather than using your back. Essentially that’s what my deadlift is, it’s a leg press. I do still leg press once a week – I’ll usually work up to about 90% for three sets of about 6-8 reps. Nothing too strenuous, just enough to keep my slow-twitch muscles active, then I train my fast-twitch muscles on the deadlifts.

3 Get a stronger upper back
Once you get the bar above your knees it’s all hips and upper back. Upper back stuff helps a lot with my lockout: lat pull-downs, one arm rows, bent over barbell rows. That’s all I do, basically.

4 Recovery’s as important as training
You’ve got to get recovery right – there are probably a hundred different things that I’m doing for recovery that other people aren’t doing. I’ve got a hyperbaric chamber in my garden – it’s basically pure oxygen under a heavy PSI pressure. One hour in there equates to about twelve hours of recovery. So let’s say I’m doing 10 hours a week, I’m getting a hundred hours of recovery on every other athlete. That might be too far, but you’ve got to take everything into account: sleep, food, quality of rest. It all counts.

5 …and don’t be afraid to use accessories
All I wanted was 500 kilos. If people want to cry about me using wrist straps and a deadlift suit, then…fuck them, basically. I’ve pulled 500 kilos, that’s what I said I’d do and that’s what I did.

Share.

Leave A Reply

x

2

Posts Remaining

Subscribe | Login